Working Papers Home


2014 Working Papers
2013 Working Papers
2012 Working Papers
2011 Working Papers
2010 Working Papers
2009 Working Papers
2008 Working Papers
2007 Working Papers
2006 Working Papers
2005 Working Papers
2004 Working Papers
2003 Working Papers
2002 Working Papers
2001 Working Papers
2000 Working Papers


Search All Papers


JEL Classification


Past Working Papers (Prior to 2000)


Office of Research
Home Page



Information on
Submitting a Paper



 
 
"The Market Evolution and Sales Take-Off of Product Innovations"

Rajshree Agarwal and Barry L. Bayus

 

First Author :

Rajshree Agarwal
Business Administration
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
1206 S. Sixth Street, M/C 706
Champaign, IL 61820
USA

agarwalr@uiuc.edu

http://www.business.uiuc.edu/faculty/agarwal.html


Second Author :

Barry L. Bayus
Business Administration
University of North Carolina
Kenan-Flagler Business School
CB 3490
Chapel Hill, NC 27599
USA

919-962-3210
919-962-7186 (Fax)

Barry_Bayus@UNC.edu

 
 
Abstract :
 
In contrast to the prevailing supply-side explanation that price decreases are the key driver of a sales take-off, we argue that outward shifting supply and demand curves lead to market take-off. Our fundamental idea is that sales in new markets are initially low since the first commercialized forms of new innovations are primitive. Then, as new firms enter, actual and perceived product quality improves (and prices possibly drop) which leads to a take-off in sales. To provide empirical evidence for this explanation, we explore the relationship between take-off times, price decreases, and firm entry for a sample of consumer and industrial product innovations commercialized in the US over the past 150 years. Based on a proportional hazards analysis of take-off times, we find that new firm entry dominates other factors in explaining observed sales take-off times. We also find no evidence that price mediates the relationship between firm entry and take-off time. We interpret these results as supporting the idea that demand shifts during the early evolution of a new market due to non-price factors is the key driver of a sales take-off.
 
 
Manuscript Received : 2002
Manuscript Published : 2002
 
 
This abstract has been viewed 2654 times.
Click here to view the full text of this paper.