The NEW MBA

MBA PROGRAMS AROUND THE COUNTRY ARE PLACING THEMSELVES UNDER THE MICROSCOPE. ILLINOIS IS NO EXCEPTION
The manager of the future will need both depth and rigor, frequently in subject areas that go beyond traditional disciplines.

In an effort to be responsive to employer needs and student expectations, the Illinois MBA has been involved in a year long self-study. As the business environment becomes increasingly complex and dynamic, managers must be prepared to succeed in organizations that may be resized and are less hierarchical than in the past. Firms will continue to be more entrepreneurial, more global in orientation. The manager of the future will need both depth and rigor, frequently in subject areas that go beyond traditional disciplines. Effective communication, both written and oral, and strong interpersonal skills will prove increasingly imp important in the workplace. Managers must also understand the concepts of team-based management and have strong leadership potential. A successful MBA program must be responsive to these needs.

A proposal to restructure the Illinois MBA was approved by the faculty in April. That plan includes a new, eight-unit core, a seven-unit set of professional tracks, and three elective units in the business environment courses. Now that the plan has been approved, new courses must be developed and implemented. Enter Glenn Detrick. We are relying on his expertise to help us plan the best courses possible to achieve our ultimate goal: to gain wide recognition as a world-class business school. The target date for implementation is August 1995 for the first year of the program, August '96 for the second year.

A consultant in the area of graduate management education, Glenn Detrick, has been hired as the director of MBA curriculum development. Detrick (M.B.A., B.A. Michigan State University), comes to the job superbly qualified. From 1990-1993 he was vice president of educational programs for the Graduate Management Admission Council.

STRUCTURAL CHANGES:

The program will present information sequentially, with both vertical and horizontal integration. This approach to learning more closely mirrors the way business functions, while providing the theoretical underpinning of knowledge students will need in order to adapt to new situations.