MBA

MBA Placement — Good and Getting Better

ON THE FOURTH FLOOR OF DAVID KINLEY HALL, AMONG THE FLAGS OF THE MANY NATIONS REPRESENTED BY ILLINOIS MBA STUDENT PAST AND PRESENT, HANGS A BULLETIN BOARD THAT SAYS IT ALL, IN ONE CAPITALIZED WORD: CONGRATULATIONS!

Below, are posted pages and pages of job listings for the Class of 1998 — printouts filled with company names like Allied, Andersen Consulting, Arthur Andersen, Citibank, Ford, and Johnson & Johnson. When it comes to job placement for Illinois MBA students, the news is good — and getting better.

Preliminary statistics show that 64 percent of the students who reported details of their recent employment decisions to the MBA Career Services Office got signing bonuses, ranging in size from $2,000 to $48,000. Median salaries shot up — by as much as $10,000 in the hottest areas, such as automotive and mechanical manufacturing, and consulting. The biggest source of job offers — 35 percent — came from on-campus interviews, with a further 19 percent resulting from attendance at a job fair. Only employment in the non-profit sector — never a popular choice for MBA grads — took a hit, dropping from 6 percent of the class to 2 percent.

"Bonuses are something employers are having to use to attract top candidates," observes Elizabeth Polak, director of MBA Career Services. "In the `80s, signing bonuses were typically associated with investment banking and consulting. But they're not industry-specific any longer. Manufacturing companies are feeling pressure to — basically — ante up." Other trends Polak notes in MBA placement and recruitment include more and more interest in high-tech fields. Oracle, for example, is coming to campus this fall for the first time ever to interview Illinois MBAs. Companies interested in the "Techno MBAs" of Illinois, though, "are not just in the high tech industry," Polak notes. "There are companies in many fields looking for information technology professionals." She further observes that this year's strong economy has allowed more international students to find employment stateside. "More companies are practicing what they preach about being global," she concludes. "They realize they need to be hiring people from all over the world, and giving them cross-cultural experiences."


MBA Team Makes Nationals

Each spring, KPMG Peat Marwick LLP and George Washington University sponsor a National Case Competition in which MBA students from all over the country compete. This year, the Illinois MBA team placed among the five finalists in the event, held March 27-29 in Washington, D.C. Approximately forty institutions fielded teams for the competition, analyzing a case that centered on Habitat for Humanity. Illinois MBA team members included Rohini Batra, Elizabeth Miner, Steve Mills, and Kavitha Prabhakar. Lawson Lau was team advisor. Dave Wilson (Ph.D., accountancy, '72), who is president and CEO of GMAC and served as a judge for the competition, described their performance as "first rate," and said the four "carried the Illini banner with great pride and aplomb."
Members of the team after the competition. Pictured from left to right are Steve Mills, Rohini Batra, and Elizabeth Miner. Not pictured, Kavitha Prabhakar.